Monday, March 24, 2008

Wooden frame

We were riding the streetcar down St. Charles Avenue with my son and his wife a couple weeks ago, and I decided to shoot some of the mansion we passed by. This one caught my eye as we clanged past, but it wasn't till I got home and looked at the shots that I noticed the interesting play of the trees-- still trying to come back to their former glory from being windswept by Hurricane Katrina, they give seem to me to give a framing effect that brings out the stateliness of the the mansion.

--steve buser

9 comments:

Southern Heart said...

Absolutely gorgeous, Steve. I love the framing effect, too.

This is my favorite time of year in New Orleans. We used to visit every year, until my sons discovered Spring Training.

oldmanlincoln said...

Was this whole area also under water? It is a magnificent picture. I think those trees are going to make it.


Abraham Lincoln in Brookville, Ohio

Olivier said...

ce manoir est très beau, il a une superbe architecture

This house is beautiful, it has a superb architecture

Halcyon said...

It certainly is a beautiful building. Is it privately owned? Do princes and princesses reside there? :)

Steve Buser said...

Abe --- St. Charles Ave. was kind of the demarcation line for flooding. St. Charles follow the River, the flooding was mostly on the side of St. Charles away from the river. Why not on the river side? Because long before there were levees the Mississippi would overflow its banks and build up that area with silt. It is now affectionately known as the Sliver on the River.

Moi said...

beautiful cheery mansion.........and yes framing accentuates the stately effect!!!

Steve Buser said...

Abe --- St. Charles Ave. was kind of the demarcation line for flooding. St. Charles follow the River, the flooding was mostly on the side of St. Charles away from the river. Why not on the river side? Because long before there were levees the Mississippi would overflow its banks and build up that area with silt. It is now affectionately known as the Sliver on the River.

Steve Buser said...

Abe --- St. Charles Ave. was kind of the demarcation line for flooding. St. Charles follow the River, the flooding was mostly on the side of St. Charles away from the river. Why not on the river side? Because long before there were levees the Mississippi would overflow its banks and build up that area with silt. It is now affectionately known as the Sliver on the River.

Steve Buser said...

Abe --- St. Charles Ave. was kind of the demarcation line for flooding. St. Charles follow the River, the flooding was mostly on the side of St. Charles away from the river. Why not on the river side? Because long before there were levees the Mississippi would overflow its banks and build up that area with silt. It is now affectionately known as the Sliver on the River.